Hedorah Rockzzz

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Why do I like Hedorah the Smog Monster?

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Well at all of the characters in the Showa series Hedorah is the most interesting one of them all. I have watched Godzilla movies from 1954 to the present and I have the entire collection on DVD as well as I took them and ripped into my hard drive so I can watch them on my flatscreen TV. The main reason why I like Godzilla versus the smog monster is just the monster’s extremely tall and to me uniquely designed his eyes they really stand out while the detail. His head one he’s discharging smog on to Godzilla’s head opens up and starts glowing red. The suit itself has very unique colors is a fantastic looking suit in my eyes. The movie itself I like it because it is set in the 70s and it has a very psychedelic feel to it. What a lot of you grew up in this era knows what it’s all about.

So I can appreciate this era. Well anyway another thing that I like about Hedorah is his 3 separate stages of growing. He is an alien that crashes down into the ocean from outer space and consumes the pollution causing him to grow into a tadpole and exist. And then he grows into a flying form as well as a crawling form before going into his final huge form. These are the reasons why I like Hedorah and also want to mention that the reason I created this webpage is because I was upset with the movie Godzilla final wars it did not showing off of Hedorah, so I said to myself if you’re not going to show him I will so I created this page to put it out there so people can see it because I think the doors one articles monsters out there. Clearly it on my favorite monster is it goes like this Godzilla, Hedorah, Mechagodzilla 1974 and 1975, and Gigan these are my favorite from the Showa series. In the Heisei Series it is Godzilla 1985 this is my favorite of all the suits, Destroyer, Biollante, and King Ghidorah. In the Shinsei Series in this order Godzilla, Mechagodzilla, and in Godzilla final wars my all-time favorite would have to be Gigan, Monster X and that’s it.

“Don’t lose your courage. One place where there is no pollutions in our hearts. Come on now. All of us. Our message is loud and strong. We’re going to send it up higher.”

By Yukio, the use of movement leader, in AIP’s release of Godzilla versus the smog monster

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  • Director: Yoshimitsu Banno
  • Producer: Tomoyuki Tanaka
  • Japanese Release Date: July 24, 1971, released by the Toho Motion Picture Company. Running Time 85 minutes.
  • US Release Date: July 1972, released by American International Pictures. Running Time 85 minutes.
  • Taglines: “Don’t lose your courage. One place where there is no pollutions in our hearts. Come on now. All of us. Our message is loud and strong. We’re going to send it up higher.” “Our Environment Is Doomed!”
  • Alternative Titles: Godzilla versus the Smog Monster, Godzilla versus Hedorah

Synopsis

A Marine biologist Dr. Yano is in treatment a fisherman brings him a strange saltwater tadpole. Then on television news, Dr.Yano see the gigantic version of that same tadpole sink a ship. The scientist takes his young son Kenny on a diving expedition in the area where the creature was found. While underwater, Dr.Yano is attacked by the monster tadpole, as his young son Ken is attacked on shore. Both are lucky enough to survive. Now scarred by the attack, Dr.Yano explains to the press that the creature is a living mineral made it from industrial waste. Each piece-or tadpole-has a life of its own. When combined, the creature becomes a single, huge, and dangerous entity called Hedorah, the smog monster.

The smog monster mutates in different forms. A flying disc-shaped form that spews poisonous asset in the air and one flies over people they instantly die. Another form would consume pollution from smokestacks. As a group of teenagers staging a Woodstock-like it go-Festival at the base of Mount Fuji Hedorah attacks. The teams are saved by the timely arrival of Godzilla. The battle between the monsters is a draw, and the military arrives with weapons to use against Hedorah. The combined might of humanity and Godzilla finally destroys Hedorah. But is the threat gone forever?

What I like about the Movie Godzilla Versus the Smog Monster

First I would like to say am going to point out the good points about this movie 1st Hedorah obviously a fantastic costume. The eyes that are extremely red I think Google local with details the yellow and hints of green. When Hedorah is taking a ship on Godzilla I don’t mean that in a bad way but he does do that his head expands and starts glowing red pretty damn awesome. His height and the color scheme of the suits really does stand out and especially the many stages of Hedorah another plus. Another thing I like about this movie is the storyline it sends a message that we are polluting way too much and I sent my share of redeeming slow down or not but it doesn’t seem as bad as it is oversized publicly known.

Another plus about this movie is the psychedelic theme because this movie was made in 1971 inch, straight out of the 60s you can still see the hints of the 60s especially in the disco it has squishy blood screen in the background I think that’s cool you have the female who sings the song “Save the Earth” she’s wearing psychedelic outfit that you don’t see today it would be nice though show off the shape of those women LOL. They didn’t like about the movie is affected tried to destroy Hedorah I’m just joking around. The negative parts that I didn’t really like and do not the worst things about it is that crazy Woodstock seen, but it is what is it was what they did that time. People were free they are not today we’re locked into some serious crap. Not much else I can say is really bad about the movie because it is my all-time favorite one of the Showa series with the exception of the original of course that was cool because I like everything about that movie it’s background of the prompts the Godzilla suit everything.

The Vital Statistics of Hedorah the Smog Monster

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Water Form

  • Length: 0.1 millimeters-20 meters
  • Mass: Unknown
  • Powers/Weapons: Can fire acidic mud; adept swimmer; body has a corrosive effect; extraordinary jumper; increases in toxicity as it consumes more pollution; able to join with other Hedorahs to change its form and size; immune to radiation and the effects of Godzilla’s Atomic Ray
  • First Appearance: Godzilla vs. Hedorah (1971)

Land Form

  • Height: 30 meters
  • Mass: Unknown
  • Powers/Weapons: Flight; can fire acidic mud; adept swimmer; body has a corrosive effect; extraordinary jumper; increases in toxicity as it consumes more pollution; able to join with other Hedorahs to change its form and size; immune to radiation and the effects of Godzilla’s Atomic Ray
  • First Appearance: Godzilla vs. Hedorah (1971)

Flying Form

  • Length: 40 meters
  • Mass: Unknown
  • Powers/Weapons: Flight at mach 1; can fire Crimson energy beams from the top of its eyes that will create toxic smoke after hitting their target; releases sulfuric acid mist when it flies; body has a corrosive effect; increases in toxicity as it consumes more pollution; able to join with other Hedorahs to change its form and size; immune to radiation and the effects of Godzilla’s Atomic Ray; can change back and forth from final for
  • First Appearance: Godzilla vs. Hedorah (1971)

Final Form

  • Height: 60 meters
  • Mass: 52,800 tons
  • Powers/Weapons: Can fire Crimson energy beams from the top of its eyes that will create toxic smoke after hitting their target; body has a corrosive effect; extraordinary jumper; able to discharge vast quantities of sludge; increases in toxicity as it consumes more pollution; able to join with other Hedorahs to change its form and size; immune to radiation and the effects of Godzilla’s Atomic Ray; can change back and forth from flying form
    Weakness: Can die from dehydration
  • First Appearance: Godzilla vs. Hedorah (1971)

Hedorah Millennium Form

  • Height: 394 Feet Tall
  • Weight: 70,000 Tons
  • Powers: None
  • First Appearance: Godzilla Final Wars (2004)
  • Fight Record: Wins 0, Losses 1, Ties 0

Descriptions

King Kong, Anguirus, Mothra, and Rodan are representative of Godzilla’s early foes: basic no-frills monsters who rely on horns, claws, and teeth in battle. But the 1970s ushered in a new style of monster, radical in design and often sporting an arsenal of garish ray beams and other fantastic weapons. Leading the pack of more elaborate monsters is Hedorah, aka the Smog Monster, a mobile sludge pile created when an alien spore from space combined with Earth’s overpowering industrial waste. Uke Mothra, Hedorah is a transforming monster, beginning life as a multitude of tiny, tadpole like creatures swimming in polluted water throughout the oceans.

Two by two, the tadpoles meet and unite, growing ever larger until they evolve into a gigantic form that moves onto the land in search of more concentrated forms of pollution. Hedorah’s next incarnation is a flying form, soaring across Japan like a filthy Frisbee, spewing sulfuric acid mist and disintegrating every thing unfortunate enough to be caught in its path. Rnally, the ultimate Hedorah appears as a towering, standing creature, but it is able to transform back into flying form as the need arises .Never before had Godzilla fought a foe with such a variety of weapons at its disposal. In addition to the choking sulfuric smog it spews, Hedorah can fire an explosive crimson ray from the corners of its eyes, spit globs of acidic mud, or suffocate its foe in a lava like flow of liquid muck.

Being comprised of sludge, Hedorah seems invulnerable to conventional attack. Punches go right through with no permanent damage, while Godzilla’s ray is deflected and diminished by the alien mineral content of the Smog Monster’s mass. Hedorah’s only susceptibility is to dehydration-a weakness that allowed human technology to combine with the power of Godzilla to finally bring down the curtain on Hedorah’s reign of terror. 1971 was the beginning of a new era in Godzilla films. Every Godzilla movie after Godzilla vs. Hedorah had foes with some sort of super weapon (i.e. ray, acid, eye beams, etc,) with the exception of Titanosaurus

The Origins of Hedorah the Smog Monster

Godzilla vs Hedorah (also known as Godzilla vs the Smog Monster, and Gojira Tai Hedorah in the original Japanese) is a 1971 film. Part of the Toho studio’s Godzilla series, it was directed by Yoshimitsu Banno with special effects by Teruyoshi Nakano.

Hedorah was an alien life form that landed on Earth and began feeding on pollution. Thanks to his toxic nature, as well as his acidic, poisonous body, Hedorah very nearly put an end to Godzilla in their struggle. Godzilla finally put an end to Hedorah by completely drying him out using electrical generators set up by the military and his own radioactive breath. The movie contains several strange impressionistic animated scenes portraying the smog monster at his evil work.

On a side note, this was the first time we see Godzilla fly. He uses his atomic breath as jet propulsion.

Tomoyuki Tanaka, who produced the first 22 Godzilla films was in the hospital while the film was made. Upon recovery and actually seeing the film, it is said that he told the director of the film that he ruined the Godzilla series and that he would never direct at Toho ever again.

This was the eleventh Godzilla film. It is one that has earned its own special niche, due to a listing in the Medved Brothers The Fifty Worst Movies of All Time (1977), as the worst of all Japanese monster movies. Which is not quite the case. Certainly, there have been worse films made. Even worse Godzilla films – the subsequent entries Godzilla vs Gigan/Godzilla on Monster Island (1972) or Godzilla vs the Cosmic Monster (1974) are much worse than this, for instance. Japanese monster movies require a necessary state of critical suspension – they make a peculiar kind of sense when viewed not as monster movies but as a kind of pulp fairy-tale. Although by this point, the Godzilla series had become so pitched to juvenile audiences that he can be shown as a toy played with by the film’s token child. And the Godzilla on show is not the best looking of Godzilla’s – its neck for some reason being much longer and scrawnier and absurd-looking, while its appearance comes accompanied by ludicrous mock Spaghetti Western music.

The Hedorah creation has much potential as both metaphor and monster. Pollution had now supplanted the Bomb as the major anxiety in the Japanese national psyche and featured in one way or another in most of the Godzilla films of the 1970s. “As we created it, Hedorah is our punishment,” says one character with typical Japanese monster movie self-flagellation at one point. (Although the American version creates confusion by then throwing in an entirely muddled explanation about Hedorah having arrived from outer space on a meteorite). A dubbed song goes on about pollution: “We have cobalt full of mercury/Too many fumes in our oxygen/All the smog now is choking you and me/Good Lord, where is it going to end ?/… For tomorrow you and me, we’re movin’, movin’ to the Moon now/We know what it’s worth to save the Earth/Come raise your voice.”

The Hedorah monster with its cartoonish orange eyes is too absurd to be taken seriously. Although some of the wild images of it sitting atop chimneys sucking up carbon fumes; or with it like a giant flying oyster, riding on jets, crisping people and buildings beneath it with its acid mist; it dive-bombing and sitting atop cars in a traffic jam with its orange eyes balefully staring, have their moments. The American version has thrown in a series of animation scenes, which illustrate the action but have absolutely nothing to do with the rest of the plot.

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Trivia based on Hedorah the Smog Monster

  • A sequel, set in Africa, was planned. However, G-series producer Tomoyuki Tanaka, who had been hospitalized during the film’s production, was enraged by the film once he saw it, telling director Yoshimitsu Banno that he had ruined the Godzilla series. Tanaka immediately ordered the filming of a more conventional Godzilla movie (Chikyu kogeki meirei: Gojira tai Gaigan (1972)). Thus, the “Smog” sequel was never made.
  • This is the first film in the series since Mosura tai Gojira (1964) to have a strong social message attached to it.
  • This is the only movie in which Godzilla demonstrates his ability to fly by firing his atomic breath towards the ground and propelling himself backwards
  • This is the only movie in which Godzilla demonstrates his ability to fly by firing his atomic breath towards the ground and propelling himself backwards.
  • When Godzilla chases down Hedorah near the end of the film, the director originally shot two different scenes. One had Godzilla chasing Hedorah on foot, the other had Godzilla flying after him. The flying scene was the one used in the final cut of the film, because the director thought a comical scene was needed to lighten up an otherwise dark film.
  • This was the last Godzilla film to be released by American International Pictures (AIP) and dubbed by Titra Productions. The remaining Godzilla films from this decade were released by Downtown Distribution and/or Cinema Shares, and simply used edited versions of Toho’s international English prints.
  • This was the first film that featured Kenpachiro Satsuma to wear the Smog Monster suit. Though small in stature, Satsuma was quite strong for his size, and was the only one capable of supporting the 300 pound suit for long periods of time. (Though there were some wire works to help support.) Satsuma then went on to wear the Gigan costume for the next two films. After a break of over 10 years, he would be asked to wear the Godzilla costume for Godzilla 1985, and would continue to wear it through the Heisei series, and retired after Godzilla vs. Destroyah in 1995.
  • In the scene where a piece of Hedora comes down the stairs of the club during Godzilla and Hedora’s first battle, there is a picture of Martin Luther King hanging on the wall behind it.
  • One of the films included in “The Fifty Worst Films of All Time (and how they got that way)” by Harry Medved and Randy Lowell.

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